I like whole wheat because you can fix it for breakfast, lunch or dinner. I prepare a big batch in my larger thermos, eat some immediately, and put the rest in the fridge for later.

Our instructions will make more sense after you quickly read through our thermos cooking basics.

Basic Recipe

Ratio: 1 part whole wheat kernels to 1 plus a little extra part water (I used 2 cups wheat and 2.5 cups water)
Salt:
a scant 1/2 teaspoon per cup of wheat
Cooking Time: overnight

Directions

  1. Boil enough water to fill up your thermos. I like to use an electric kettle, but use the stove or whatever else you have.
  2. While it’s heating, get your ingredients ready.
  3. Fill up your thermos with boiling water, close the lid, and set aside.
  4. Measure out your water, remember to use just slightly more than the amount of wheat you are cooking.
  5. Boil your measured water.
  6. When your measured liquid is about ready to boil, pour out the water from the thermos.
  7. Dump the wheat and salt into the thermos. I use a canning funnel to try to make this easier.
  8. Pour the boiling water into the thermos, close it up, give in a few shakes, and lay it down on the counter.
  9. In the morning, pour the contents of the thermos into a small mesh strainer to remove the excess water.

Because the wheat is in its whole kernel state it needs all night to cook. You can cook as much or as little wheat as you like, but it is important to fill your thermos close to capacity with boiling water so the thermos will stay hot all night long. Also, the wheat will not absorb all of the water so it will still slosh some when it is done.

Remember that you can’t overcook it, so you don’t have worry about leaving all day or night. Just leave it on the counter and eat it when you’re ready – convenient, isn’t it?

Learn about the nutritional value of whole wheat.

I’ve Cooked My Wheat! What Do I Do with It Now?

Breakfast:

Lunch/Salads:

Dinner:

  • Mix it into chili
  • Add it to stir-fry
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